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Posts Tagged ‘buddhism’

Chaiya Buddha (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

Buddha Statue in Chaiya

Buddha statue in Chaiya

Buddha statue in Chaiya

This mind has been deluded now for who knows how many lifetimes. Whatever we don’t like or love, we want to avoid. We just indulge in our fears, and then we say we’re practicing. This can’t be called practice. If it’s real practice, you’ll even risk your life. If you’ve really made up your mind to practice, why would you take an interest in petty concerns?

– Ajahn Chah, in Food for the Heart, p. 263.

From: Food for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah. Ajahn Chah. Wisdom Publications, Somerville, MA, 2002.


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The Wednesday Photo is a new picture each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

Southern Buddha Statue (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, December 30th, 2009

Nakhon Si Thammarat Buddha

Buddha Statue

Buddha Statue

When you see thinking as thinking, then that’s wisdom. Don’t believe any of it! Recognize that all of it is just something that has arisen and will cease. Simply see everything just as it is – it is what it is – the mind is the mind – it’s not anything or anybody in itself. Happiness is just happiness, suffering is just suffering – it is just what it is.

– Ajahn Chah, in Food for the Heart, p. 274.

From: Food for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah. Ajahn Chah. Wisdom Publications: Somerville, MA, 2002.


See also:


The Wednesday Photo is a new picture  each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

Earth Mother Goddess (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

Earth Mother Goddess, Ubon Ratchathani

Earth Mother Goddess

Earth Mother Goddess

Many temples in Thailand have a statue or mural similar to this statue from Ubon Ratchathani in Northeastern Thailand (Isahn). It depicts the Earth Mother Goddess ringing out her hair at the time of the Buddha’s enlightenment. The story goes thus:

After many years of searching and wandering, the Buddha sat down determined not to rise from his seat until he had attained enlightenment. As he sat, all the temptations of the world came to attempt to distract him; these distractions are called Mara. As he sat and contemplated, Mara mocked him, saying “You claim you are enlightened! Well who, then, will witness and testify to your enlightenment?” At this, the Buddha pointed a hand down to the earth, indicating that the Earth Mother Goddess would witness. The Earth Mother Goddess was washing her hair and as she wrung out her hair, the water from it overcame and swept Mara, with all his distractions, away, leaving behind the newly enlightened Buddha.

There is, thus, a strong feminine component to Thai Buddhism and, if you look, you’ll notice her image in most Thai temples.


The Wednesday Photo is a new picture  each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

Outdoor Buddha (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

Buddha Statue in Udon Thani

Stone Buddha Image

Stone Buddha Image

Thailand is, of course, a predominantly Buddhist Country; estimates say 90% or higher of the people are Buddhists. This lovely Buddha image is found at Phu Phrabat Historical Park in Udon Thani Province in northeastern Thailand (Isahn). The aging of the stone is a lovely reminder that everything which is created also eventually passes away.

Now while this discourse was being delivered the spotless, immaculate vision of the Dhamma arose in the venerable Kondanna thus: All that is subject to arising is subject to cessation.

Kondanna had his realization after the Buddha’s first teaching (“Setting Rolling the Wheel of the Dhamma”) to the 5 ascetics that he had been part of before he went his own way to find enlightenment.

This quote is in the Mahavagga 1:6 in the Vinaya Pitaka of the Buddhist Pali canon. I found it on page 44 of The Life of the Buddha by Bhikku Nanamol, published by the Buddhist Publication Society, 2001 edition.


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The Wednesday Photo is a new picture  each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

Buddha Image (Nakhon Panom) (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

Buddha Statue in Nakhon Panom

Buddha Statue in Nakhon Panom

Buddha Statue at Wat Pa Panohm in Nakhon Panom

“Don’t go fixating on the way things appear to be. Recognize whatever appears to the mind as merely so—merely a moment of sensation and awareness, something impermanent that arises and passes away. There is nothing more than that. There is no self or other, no essence, nothing that should be grasped.”

– Ajahn Chah, in Being Dharma, p. 113.

From: Being Dharma: The Essence of the Buddha’s Teachings. Ajahn Chah, Translated by Paul Breiter. Shambala, Boston & London, 2001.


The Wednesday Photo is a new picture  each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

Temple Saying (Wednesday Photo)

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

Temple Saying

Temple Sign in Chiang Mai

Temple Sign in Chiang Mai

Sayings such as this one are often found on the grounds of many temples and forest monasteries in Thailand. They are meant to cause the reader to reflect outside of the ordinary cares of life.

I particularly like this one. It puts our daily upsets and concerns in a different perspective: after all, in 100 years no one will know a thing about them. Cut yourself some slack!

For more on Thai Buddhism read Buddhism, Thailand, Achaan Chah or Buddha Images in Northeastern Thailand.


The Wednesday Photo is a new picture  each week highlighting something of interest in Thailand. Click on the picture to see a larger version.