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Coffee in Thailand, Part 4

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

As part of my ongoing series of blogs on coffee in Thailand, I wanted to just touch briefly on something that I’m seeing more and more here in the Kingdom: upscale coffee shops with western-style pastries. I’m seeing these fancy coffee houses more often both in malls and as stand-alone shops. I’ll look at just a couple of them, which can serve as examples.

(Click images to see larger version.)

The Missing Piece Cafe

2 Coffees

Coffee at The Missing Piece

The Missing Piece is part of a complex that includes the Moon Glass Social Bar and an excellent restaurant, Baan Khanita at 53 (Sukhumvit 53). They are located on Sukhumvit Soi 53, the soi just before Thong Lo (Sukhumvit Soi 55); the upscaleness of Thong Lo is spreading!

The Missing Piece is a small cafe (just a few tables). When you go in, you can see a selection of western-style desserts, including several types of cake and the passion fruit tartlet, which we ordered (see photo below left).

It’s a pleasant, clean shop; the barista was dressed in a uniform of sorts, which seems to be the norm in these more upscale places. Another characteristic of these shops is that the baristas all seem to actually know how to make the drinks correctly. At some of the smaller, individual stands, you never quite know what you’ll be getting. At one stand in Khao Yai National Park, for example, the latte consisted of an Americano to which the barista added some condensed milk. Here, I ordered a cappuccino and my wife ordered a caffe latte – you can see the results in the picture above.

The drinks were perfectly fine: good coffee, nothing extraordinary. The tartlet was pretty tasty: not bad at all. We had a slice of chocolate cake on another occasion and it was delicious.

Passion Fruit Tartlet

Passion fruit tartlet

Storefront

Front of The Missing Piece

Another characteristic of these shops is that you’ll pay a bit more for coffee. In smaller one-off stands or shops, you expect around 35 to 40 baht per cappuccino or latte. In the chains (such as Amazon, or Doi Inthanon) you’ll pay a bit more: 50 to 60 baht, and our local Amazon Cafe (in the Imperial World mall in Samrong) charges 70 baht for a cappuccino. To be sure, in some places such as airports, the prices are already higher. Here the price was 70 baht plus another 70 for the tartlet (the cakes were 110 baht). With VAT and service charge, we paid 243 baht for our two drinks and the small pastry. Definitely upscale pricing for Thailand. This is the only coffee shop where I have ever been charged VAT and a service charge.

I should note that the chains have gotten on the western dessert bandwagon. I had a cheesecake at our local Doi Inthanon and the local Amazon Cafe has cheesecake plus other cakes as well.

As a side note, Starbucks is among the most expensive coffee places – drinks seem to cost what they do in the states, which is high for Thailand, and even higher than at these (much nicer) individual, upscale coffee places. My advice is to avoid Starbucks; besides, the coffee is just not that good there.

Ease Café at Impact

My second example is Ease Café at the Impact Muong Thong Thani Center. We attended the annual December pre-Christmas OTOP City here. Side note: if you are ever in Thailand before Christmas you must go to OTOP City. OTOP, of course, means “One Tambon, One Product” and cities and regions all over Thailand participate in making handicrafts and products of anything you can think of. At OTOP City you get to see the best that the provinces of Thailand have to offer, all in one place. A fabulous event with (a guess) around 1,500+ booths.

Coffee & Cake

Cake and coffee

Fancy Cake

Fancy cake

Ease Café includes nicely made coffee drinks with beautiful western-style desserts. Above left is the caffe latte Kasma ordered along with the multi-layer cake we sampled. Both were quite good.

Ease Café

Ease Café

Chairs

Sitting area

The trend of higher prices continues here. The latte and cappuccino came in 3 sizes at 70, 80 or 90 baht. The cake was only 65 baht. There was no VAT or service charge here, so our two drinks and piece of cake came to 210 baht.

Offering different sizes for drinks such as cappuccinos and lattes is also somewhat new in Thailand (except for western chains): in the past (and at most shops today) there was just one size offered. The first place I saw multiple sizes at a Thai cafe was at Café Doi Tung last year.

Above left you can see the cafe as it is situated inside the Impact event center. Also, true to form, the interior is quite clean and somewhat fancy, as you can see with the photo (above right) of the sitting area. All of it is très moderne. The baristas were all dressed in uniform, another continuing trend. It’s a comfortable quiet place, a good option for taking some time out from the event you are attending.


Ending Thoughts

Coffee Sign

Fresh coffee sign

Watching the coffee culture grow in Thailand is interesting and fun. I see the กาแฟสด (kafae sot) – fresh coffee – sign in more and more places, sometimes in a sleepy little town in the middle of nowhere or in some back alley in Bangkok.

In addition to the upscale cafes, I’m seeing more chains, some of which I’ve never seen before and others (Doi Inthanon, Amazon, Black Canyon ) that seem to be increasing in number. There has been a veritable explosion of places to drink coffee all over Thailand, especially during this past year. More restaurants have their own espresso machines. I see more Thai people drinking coffee; they are the main clientele for most coffee shops.

One thing I seldom see is drip coffee – it’s nearly all expressed (espresso, Americano). Also, very few places have decaffeinated coffee (one exception being the overpriced Starbucks). I guess the Thais wonder what the point of decaf is.

Previous Blogs on Coffee in Thailand


Written by Michael Babcock, January 2015

Yum Saap Restaurant – A Thai Chain

Michael Babcock, Sunday, June 15th, 2014

Yum Saap – ยำแซ่บ แซ่บครบรส – is a restaurant chain specializing in Northeastern (Isan) food; there are around 50 branches, most located in and around Bangkok but also found as far afield as Chiang Rai and Phuket. On our last visit to Thailand we had a meal at the branch at the Imperial World Shopping Cener in Samut Prakan. Here are my impressions. (note: แซ่บครบรส is translated as “full flavor.”)

(Click images to see larger version.)

Yum Saap Restaurant

Yum Saap Restaurant

I enjoy eating at Thai restaurants of all varieties. It’s fun every once in awhile to try out the food at one of the Thai chain restaurants. Imperial World is a shopping center that is about a 10 minute klong (canal) ride and walk from our townhouse in the neighborhood of Nakhon Thong in the Samrong district of Samut Prakan (found on the edge of Bangkok). The basement of Imperial World houses a food center, which is a popular lunch destination for us, and also many restaurants, including Yum Saap. We decided to give it a try at the end of December last year (2013).

Restaurant Logo

Yum Saap Logo

Coconut Drink

Blended coconut drink

Yum Saap has a whimsical and very noticeable logo, as you can see to the left. It’s a clean restaurant, furnished not unlike chain restaurants in the U.S. (such as Denny’s or IHOP).

One item we ordered was a “Coconut Frostie” – นำ้มะพร้าวปั่น (Nam Maprao Pan), which arrived before the food. It’s a refreshing drink, not overly sweet (as some are).

Eggplant Salad

Country-style Eggplant Salad

Grilled Chicken

Grilled Chicken

As might be expected, their menu had a fair number of ยำ (yum) type salads. The menu had pictures of every item and my eye was immediately caught by Eggplant Salad (Country Style) – พล่าหมูมะเขืออ่อน – (Phla Moo Makeau Awn). I had never seen an eggplant salad made with the Thai eggplants. I wanted to try it. It did not disappoint. It included pork and was spicy and sour, with a bit of sweet. I’m hoping Kasma will duplicate this recipe for a future class! When Kasma likes a dish at a restaurant she’ll write down the ingredients and flavor profile so that when we return home, she can de-construct it and come up with her own version. Quite often, I find her versions better than the originals. Many of these show up in her Advanced Thai Cooking Classes.

Another delicious dish was the Grilled Chicken – ไก่ย่าง (Gai Yang), served with two types of dipping sauces – น้ำจิ้ม (Nam Jim); one sauce was sweet and the other was spicy and a bit sour (made with roasted chillies).

Stir-fried Morning Glory

Stir-fried Morning Glory

Vegetable Stir-fry

Vegetable Stir-fry

We ordered two other dishes. The Stir-fried Morning Glory – ผัดผักบุ้งไฟแดง (Pad Pak Boong Fai Daeng) above left. The 4th dish was Vegetables Stir-fried with Oyster Sauce and Squid. (I’m unable to find this dish listed on their online menu so can’t give you the exact name.)

All in all, the food was quite acceptable. Two of the dishes were very good and others were also good. What impressed me was that the food was authentic Thai food – it did not seem as if any shortcuts were taken. It was spicy and flavorful. I only wish I could get food that tasted as good at the chain restaurants here in the U.S.!


Location

Imperial World Samrong
999 Sukhumvit Road. Samrong Nua,
Muang, Samutprakarn 10270
General Phone : 0-2756-8217-9
Email : olarn_kit@imperialplaza.co.th
Imperial World Website
Imperial World Facebook page
Map of location of Imperial World, Samut Prakan
Bus routes to Imperial World
Google Map: for Imperial World, locate Big C Supercenter in the upper left corner.

Yum Saap Restaurant – ยำแซ่บ แซ่บครบรส
Imperial Samrong Branch – สาขา อิมพีเรียล สำโรง
For address & map – see Imperial World above. Restaurant is found on the basement floor.
Phone: 02-756-9991
Yum Saap Website (be warned, it’s one of those irritating Flash-based sites); the English option does not appear to work so it’s mostly in Thai, though the menu includes English names.
Yum Saap Facebook page
Information Page with list of branches – (Original Thai version
Review of Yum Saap, MBK (A different branch)


Written by Michael Babcock, June 2014

Vientiane Kitchen Restaurant in Bangkok

Michael Babcock, Friday, February 14th, 2014

Vientiane Kitchen is a popular Laotian restaurant on Sukhumvit Soi 36 in Bangkok. Its popularity is well-deserved. It is the “go-to” restaurant for the farewell feasts for Kasma’s small-group-trips to Thailand: we go for the food and for the entertainment.

Thai Dancers

Thai Dancers

We have often been disappointed by restaurants that the popular English guidebooks recommend – often the food disappoints. Vientiane Kitchen is (usually) one of the exceptions: the food is quite good, most of the time. In addition to the food, they have a lively show every night consisting of a northeastern Thai band with a very talented lead singer. In addition to the northeastern music, with the occasional American or Japanese song, there are also Thai dancers, and a woman singer as well. They’ve been quite good for the past 4 years.

(Click images to see larger version.)

The restaurant is popular with tourists, both western and Japanese, and can get quite crowded. Also, when the entertainment is on, do not expect to have intimate, quiet conversations – it can get very raucous and noisy. Still, it’s good fun if you’re in the right mood.

The Food

We’ve mostly had good luck with the food – we have a number of favorite dishes. The caveat here is that the quality can vary somewhat (different cooks?). Mostly the food is very good; on occasion, we’ve found it a bit off – still acceptable, though.  They do a number of dishes really, really well. Here’s another caveat: I’ve only gone with Kasma, who can order in Thai and impress upon them that we want the same food that the staff would eat – real Thai food. I don’t know if the experience would be different for westerners who can’t speak Thai.

These dishes were all photographed at the final feast for various of Kasma’s small-group tours to Thailand. Typically, she would order 6 or 7 dishes at a time, so she wouldn’t order all of these at one meal.

Fish Dish

Miang Pla

Grilled Pork

Grilled Pork

These are a couple dishes that Kasma often orders to get us started. Above left is Miang Pla – Tidbits with Fish Wrapped in a Leaf. There are a large number of miang – dishes with tidbits – in Thai cuisine; undoubtedly Miang Kam (Tasty Leaf-wrapped Tidbits) is the best known. Miang Pla is sort of like Miang Kam with the addition of fried fish. A wild pepper leaf (bai cha plu) is the leaf of choice; you take a bit of the fish, a little bit of each of the other ingredients, add a dab of sauce and pop the whole thing into your mouth for an explosion of flavors.

To the above right is Grilled Pork with a delicious, fiery dipping sauce. Both of them do a very good job of getting the appetite going.

Fried Pork Leg

Fried Pork Leg

Sour Fish

Sour Fish

Above are two of my very favorite dishes. I could very happily make an entire meal of either of these dishes. To the upper left is Fried Pork Leg – Ka Moo Tod; the pork leg, with skin on, is stewed with spices until tender, then smoked and then crispy fried so that the fat caramelizes. It’s served with a dipping sauce and with pickled ginger. So good.

To the above right is a definite northeastern specialty – Pla Som (Sour Fish). To make this, fish is mixed with garlic, rice and salt and then left to ferment for a few days until nicely sour. It’s then deep-fried and served with crispy-fried garlic. It’s a very tasty dish and must be fried so: they usually do a good job at Vientiane Kitchen. (Check out Kasma’s blog: In Search of the Best Sour Fish (Pla Som).)

Eggplant Salad

Eggplant Salad

Green Papaya Salad

Green Papaya Salad

Kasma always orders the Eggplant Salad (Yum Makeua Yao) shown above left. The eggplant is fried (much like tempura) as a base for the salad – it’s an interesting and delicious variation on the more standard version

To the right is the best-known of the northeastern salads – Green Papaya Salad (Som Tam); it’s hard NOT to order Som Tam at a northeastern restaurant. When I was traveling with Kasma in Isaan (northeastern Thailand), I learned not to order som tam made spicy: in Isan they have a much hotter spice scale than I’m used to and their standard “less-spicy” som tam was still incendiary enough for me!

Thai Soup

Hot-and-Sour Rib Soup

Vegetable Dish

Stir-fried Morning Glory

Above left is a spicy hot Hot-and-Sour Soup made with pork ribs. Very tasty. To the right we see “Red-Flamed” Morning Glory (Pak Boong Fai Daeng), one of the most popular Thai vegetable dishes.

Fried Chicken

Fried Chicken

Rice Salad

Rice Salad

Here are another two good dishes. To the above left is Fried Chicken (Gai Tod) and to the left is a northeastern salad – Crispy Rice and Sour Sausage Salad (Yum Naem Kao Tod).

Entertainment

Thai Musician

Thai musician

Thai Singer

Thai Singer

We do enjoy the entertainment at Vientiane Kitchen, which starts at 7:30 p.m. and is usually over around 10:00 p.m.: they put on a good show. For the last several years there’s been a very talented musician (shown above left playing a xylophone-like Thai instrument) who is also the lead singer of the house band; he’s been backed by a number of other musicians with various instruments, including a guitar-like instrument with 4 strings, probably indigenous to the northeast, and also a bamboo flute that resembles circular Pan pipes. In addition to the traditional northeastern music, they’ll branch out into western and Japanese songs at the audience’s request. There’s also a woman singer, shown above right between two of the dancers.

Thai Dancers

Thai Dancers

Two Dancers

Two Thai Dancers

Here are two pictures of the dancers. In the course of an evening they’ll do several dances, including the bamboo pole dance pictured at the very top of the page. Some of the entertainment is participatory – audience members are invited up on the stage to dance along.


See also:

Location

Vientiane Kitchen
8 Soi Sukhumvit 36, Sukhumvit Rd.,
Khlong Toei Nuea, Watthana,
Bangkok 10110
Phone: 02 258 6171
Vientiane Kitchen Map
Vientiane Kitchen Facebook Page


Written by Michael Babcock, February 2014

 

Shanghai Xiao Long Pao Restaurant in Bangkok

Michael Babcock, Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Shanghai Xiao Long Pao is a restaurant found on the 3rd floor at MBK Center in Bangkok. We first ate here when it was called Shanghai Happiness. Originally we thought the food was excellent but in December 2012 we ate there after the name change and were disappointed. In December 2013 we tried it again and were pleased.

Here’s our previous blog on the restaurant: Shanghai Dumplings in Thailand.

(Click images to see larger version.)

Xiao Long Pao

Xiao Long Pao

Naturally, our main reason for eating here is to get the Shanghai Dumplings – Xiao Long Pao. We were pleasantly surprised by the dumplings this visit. Although I would not put them in the transcendental category, they were quite good. The dough was not too thick, reasonably pleasant looking in appearance and acceptable tasting (if just a bit soggy). The filling itself was quite flavorful. There was some broth that squirted out when we bit into the dumpling, though I would have liked a bit more; one of the dumplings was broken so had no broth at all – it should not have been served. I thought the accompanying dipping sauce, a flavorful combination including black vinegar and chopped ginger, was excellent. All in all, a good Xiao Long Pao – I’d give it 7 on a scale of 1 to 10.

When we first went in May 2011 (see previous blog), the dumplings were excellent. In December 2012, not very good at all. This time, in December 2013, they were again pretty good. I give a caveat  that the quality here seems to vary; hope that you get here on a good day!

I was sorry to see that some of our old favorites were: no longer on the menu, particularly the Pan Fried Ham and Onion Cake, which was quite good.

Braised Pork

Braised Pork

Chinese Kale

Chinese Kale

We very nearly always get a pork belly dish here. This time we got Braised Pork and Bamboo Shoots with Brown Sauce (shown above left). The pork belly is sliced thin (a bit too thin, I think) but it’s all there, including the (yummy) fatty portions. The sauce is tasty and the bamboo shoots are a nice complement.

Kasma was hungry for vegetables so we got the Chinese Kale with Spicy Minced Pork Sauce (shown above right). This may have been my favorite dish: the sauce was very flavorful and just a bit spicy.

Seaweed Rice

Chinese Seaweed Rice

Taro Dessert

Taro in Coconut Milk Dessert

Alas, with just two of us eating, we were unable to order too many dishes. In addition to the 3 above, we ordered a bowl of “Chinese Seaweed Rice” (above left). This is the rice they serve with their “Chicken Rice.” It’s made a bit like a risotto, with plenty of delicious, healthy chicken fat. It’s very good.

We finished up with a dessert, Taro Balls in Coconut Milk (Bua Loi Peuak). A nice, not-too-sweet way to end the meal.


All in all, I hope to eat here again. I’d like to confirm that the Shanghai Dumplings remain good and try a few other dishes on the menu to see how good they are. I would give the restaurant a qualified recommendation at this point, pending further visits.


Restaurant Logo

Restaurant Logo

Restaurant Sign

Restaurant Sign

Look for these two signs on the outside of the restaurant. Also, check out our previous blog for more pictures of the outside as well as some of the inside, which remains unchanged since that original blog.


All of this blog pertains to the Shanghai Xiao Long Pao restaurant at MBK Center at 444 Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok. MBK is pretty easy to get to since it’s within walking distance of the National Stadium skytrain station. The restaurant is found on the third floor in the Tokyu zone.


Written by Michael Babcock, January 2014

Hongkong Noodle in Bangkok’s Chinatown

Michael Babcock, Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Hongkong Noodle is a noodle and dim sum shop found right in the middle of Chinatown’s Talat Kao (ตลาดเก่า) in Bangkok. As you stroll up the narrow market lane from Yaowarat Road, keep an eye to your left until you spy the Hongkong Noodle sign with the busy kitchen in the front and head on in for some great dim sum.

Dim Sum Baskets

A stack of dim sum containers

Talat Kao is found on a small alleyway called Trok Issaranuphap, which is sometimes signposted as Soi Issaranuphap or as Soi 16 (acording to Wikitravel). It intersects Yaowarat Road at Mangkorn Road, therabouts. It’s a colorful market with all kinds of foods – I previously blogged on it back in 2009 – Bangkok’s Chinatown Market. Another blog (Cranky Little Monster) called it the Leng Buay Lea market.

(Click images to see larger version.)

Dim Sum

Some of the dim sum

Hongkong Noodle is a chain found in 8 locations in Bangkok; at least a couple more are in Chinatown. Apparently this is the original shop (unconfirmed).

The Kitchen

The kitchen at Hongkong Noodle

Some Food

Some of the ingredients

Kasma takes some of her small-group tours to Thailand to this colorful market for a pre-breakfast walk and then for a dim sum meal at Hongkong Noodle. You walk through the kitchen & food prep area on your way to the rather small dining area: if you’re lucky there will be a table available right away.

Dining Room View

Dining room view

Dining Area

The dining area

The dining area is very lively; it can feel a bit cramped. If you sit facing the front, you can see past the bustling kitchen to the market lane, usually crowded with shoppers and activity. If I recall correctly, the signs are all in Thai. It’s not really a problem: you can point out the dim sum dishes that you want to eat and there are also pictures of the various noodle dishes that you can point to.

Dim Sum

Some of the dim sum

Noodle Soup

Roast Duck Noodle Soup

The dim sum was quite good: fresh and tasty. We also ordered a couple bowls of the Duck Noodle Soup for people to try and it was also good. I would definitely recommend this as a breakfast or lunch stop. Check out the slideshow below for some of the dim sum dishes. There’s also a second slideshow of some of the workers there (further down)


Slideshow of Food Dishes

Click on “Play” below to begin a slideshow.

Clicking on a slide will take you to the next image.

Dim Sum 1
Shrimp Dumplings
Dim Sum 2
Shrimp & Chive Dumplings
Noodle Soup
Roast Duck
Stack of Dim Sum

A stuffed shrimp dim sum dish

Shrimp Dumplings - Har Gow

Another of of the dim sum dishes

Shrimp & Chive Dumplings

Roast Duck Noodle Soup at Hongkong Noodle

A plate of Roast Duck

A stack of dim sum in the traditional bamboo baskets

Dim Sum 1 thumbnail
Shrimp Dumplings thumbnail
Dim Sum 2 thumbnail
Shrimp & Chive Dumplings thumbnail
Noodle Soup thumbnail
Roast Duck thumbnail
Stack of Dim Sum thumbnail

Slideshow of Hongkong Noodle Workers

Click on “Play” below to begin a slideshow.

Clicking on a slide will take you to the next image.

Restaurant Staff
Stacking Dim Sum
Preparing Noodles
img-3657.jpg

Some of the staff at Hongkong Noodle

One of the servers prepares to serve some dim sum

A young man getting together a bowl of noodles.

Restaurant Staff thumbnail
Stacking Dim Sum thumbnail
Preparing Noodles thumbnail
img-3657.jpg thumbnail

Restaurant Sign

Sign for Hongkong Noodle


Written by Michael Babcock, December 2013

Yok Yor Marina Restaurant in Bangkok

Michael Babcock, Sunday, September 15th, 2013
Yok Yor Sign

Yok Yor Marina Restaurant sign

Yok Yor Marina Restaurant – ห้องอาหารยกยอมารีน่า – in Bangkok is one of the restaurants where Kasma takes her small-group tours to Thailand. It specializes in fresh seafood and we have always gotten an excellent, tasty meal there. Yok Yor Marina is situated right on the Chao Phraya river. As you sit and eat you can watch the boats go by on the river. Although it’s nothing fancy, the food is always tasty and good and there’s usually a very nice cooling breeze coming in off the river. There’s a second restaurant – Yok Yor Klongsan – nearby. (See below for address and link to a map.)

Be sure to click on the images (especially the food pictures) to see larger version. We also have a slide show of the food pictures at the bottom of the page.

Yok Yor Interior

Inside Yok Yor Marina

Yok Yor View

View from Yok Yor Marina

These two pictures show one of the tables at Yok Yor Marina where Kasma’s trip members are enjoying one of many feasts on the tour during her shorter 19-day trip to Central and Northern Thailand (Trip B) in January 2012. The interior is nothing fancy but comfortable. The other picture shows one of the many barges going past on the Chao Phraya river.

I’m going to mostly let the pictures of the dishes Kasma orders speak for themselves. In a typical meal here she would order 6 dishes and rice to be eaten family style.

Duck Curry

Roast Duck Curry

Garlic Pepper Squid

Garlic Pepper Squid

Kasma almost always orders the dish to the upper left – Roast Duck Curry. It’s a red curry with succulent duck as the meat. Quite nice. On the right we see Garlic-Peppered Squid with a dipping sauce. The squid is nicely cooked, meaning it’s tender and not too chewy. (It’s quite easy to overcook squid and turn it rubbery.)

Seafood Laab

Seafood Laab

Crab Dish

Crab Dish

Above left  we see a Seafood Laab (also transliterated as Larb), fresh, spicy (as a laab usually is) and crunchy from the toasted rice. Kasma always gets one of a couple of crab dishes here, such as the one to the upper right.

Steamed Fish

Steamed Fish

Crab in Yellow Curry

Crab in Yellow Curry

Yok Yor Marina does a very good Steamed Fish, upper left. To be good, the fish must be very, very fresh indeed: this one was. The above right Crab in Yellow Curry is quite good. Lots of liberated (from the shell) crab meat in a yellow curry sauce; succulent and tasty.

Fried Fish with Green Mango

Fried Fish with Green Mango

Sour Pork Ribs

Sour Pork Ribs

Kasma sometimes orders the Fried Fish with Green Mango that is above left. Another frequent item on the table for our groups is the Northern Sour Pork Ribs on right; the tasty, fermented meat is served with a variety of accoutrements (the shallots, greens, peanuts, garlic, often chillies), which are popped in the mouth with a piece of the rib. Yummy.


Slideshow – Some Dishes at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Click on “Play” below to begin a slideshow.

Clicking on a slide will take you to the next image.

Duck Curry
Garlic Pepper Squid
Seafood Laab
Crab Dish
Steamed Fish
Crab in Yellow Curry
Fried Fish with Green Mango
Sour Pork Ribs

Duck Curry at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Garlic Pepper Squid at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Seafood Laab at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Crab dish at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Steamed Fish at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Crab in Yellow Curry at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Fried Fish with Green Mango at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Sour Pork Ribs at Yok Yor Marina Restaurant

Duck Curry thumbnail
Garlic Pepper Squid thumbnail
Seafood Laab thumbnail
Crab Dish thumbnail
Steamed Fish thumbnail
Crab in Yellow Curry thumbnail
Fried Fish with Green Mango thumbnail
Sour Pork Ribs thumbnail


Yok Yor Marina Restaurant
885 Somdet Chaophraya 17 Rd
Klong San Bangkok 10600
Tel. 02-863-0565-6, 02-863-1708
Service time : 11.00 – 24.00 hours
Website for Klongsan branch: www.yokyor.co.th


Written by Michael Babcock, September 2013