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Beginning Thai Cooking With Kasma, Class #3

Michael Babcock, September 1st, 2012

Kasma Loha-unchit teaches a beginning series of 4 Thai cooking classes several times a year. This is my blog on the third of those four classes, exploring how the classes take place and what delicious Thai dishes are served. Kasma has been teaching Thai cooking to U.S. students since 1985.

I’ve also blogged on the other classes in the series:

Kasma’s initial series of 4 classes is designed as a sequence of classes to introduce the basics of Thai cooking. This, the third class, continues on from the first two, including more basic information about Thai ingredients and cooking techniques while introducing 5 new recipes.

Learning more about rice is an important part of the third class.

Soaking Brown Rice

Soaking brown rice

Sticky Rice Steamer

Sticky rice steamer

(Click images to see larger version.)

Having already covered cooking of jasmine rice (ข้าวหอมมะลิ – kao hom mali) in the first sessions, in class #3 Kasma introduces brown jasmine rice. Over the past few years, in part because of the support of the Royal Family, whole grain rice has been growing in popularity in Thailand. (See Kasma’s Blog Whole Grain Rice Makes a Comeback in Thailand.) To bring out maximum nutrition, whole-grain rice should be soaked for at least 22 hours prior to cooking. (For more details see Kasma’s blog How to Cook Brown Rice for Maximum Nutrition.) She also teaches how to cook white sticky rice (ข้าวเหนียว – Kao Niow) using the traditional bamboo basket that is found throughout northeastern Thailand (อีสาน – Isan), where, traditionally, it is the daily rice eaten with all meals. (See Kasma’s recipe for Steamed White Sticky Rice (ข้าวเหนียวนึ่ง – Kao Niow Neung.)

Cleaning Squid

Cleaning squid

Another thing that Kasma teaches in this class is how to clean whole squid; everyone gets an opportunity to clean a couple. It’s one thing I appreciate about the classes: Kasma teaches you to use ingredients (such as shrimp or squid) as you would purchase them in any Asian market, where they are more likely to be sold whole and not cleaned. It’s not difficult to do and the reward is that a whole squid, frozen or not, is likely to be more fresh than one that has been pre-cleaned.

Students Prepping Food

Students prepping food

Cutting Lemon Grass

Cutting lemon grass

As always, the students do all of the prep work themselves; the chopping, mincing and dicing, cleaning the squid and more. We’ve had students who have taken cooking classes in Thailand who tell us that typically, all of the ingredients are already prepped for them. Kasma has the students do the prep because when they cook at home, they’ll have to do it themselves. She teaches how to cook all of these dishes from start to finish by yourself.

Kasma Cooks

Kasma frying shrimp

Cooking Long beans

Cooking long beans

Final assembly and cooking of the dishes in the beginning series is done by Kasma and by the students. The picture to the left shows Kasma deep frying the Garlic Peppered Shrimp. This will be the first time that many students have deep fried anything at all, so she starts out by demonstrating what to do; after her initial demo, she’ll ask for volunteers and students will finish off the cooking. She’s already gone over stir-frying in previous sessions, so she has one of the students cook the Stir-Fried Long Beans with Roasted Chilli Sauce and Thai Basil. All of the students get to watch the final assembly/cooking so that they really do learn to cook every dish in the class and not just the one they have worked on.

Squid Salad

Plating Squid Salad

Meal Time

Students enjoying a feast

After the food is plated and ready to serve, we come to the very best part of class: the feast at the end. What’s best of all is knowing that you can go home and cook everything yourself.

Beginning Thai Series Class #3 Menu

Garlic Peppered Shrimp

Garlic Peppered Shrimp

Garlic-Peppered Shrimp – กุ้งกระเทียมพริกไทย (Goong Kratiem Prik Thai): Although this is a common item on Thai menus, both in Thailand and here in the U.S., I’ve never had a version quite like Kasma’s. Her recipe uses a lot of garlic (1-2 heads per pound of shrimp) and black pepper to coat the shrimp, which, with the shell still on, is deep-fried until crispy. It makes a crunchy, peppery, garlicky snack that is delicious, indeed. Some students are, at first, reluctant to eat a shrimp with the shell on: they soon find that it has been rendered crispy and that it adds a needed dimension to the dish. They usually come back for seconds. And thirds. And even fourths!

Squid Salad

Squid Salad

Hot and Sour Calamari Salad – ยำปลาหมึก (Yum Pla Meuk): The very first Thai dish I ever ate was a Squid Salad at Siam Cuisine on University Avenue in Berkeley (long out of business); this must have been back in the early 1980s. The salad has lots of fresh herbs (lemon grass, galanga, mint and cilantro) and a hot and sour dressing consisting of chillies, garlic, fish sauce and lime juice, with a bit of sugar to pull all the tastes together. Kasma’s version is as hot as I remember my first attempt but now I can eat spicy. This is a terrific, prototypical Thai salad.

Long Beans

Stir-Fried Long Beans

Stir-Fried Long Beans with Roasted Chilli Sauce and Thai Basil – ถั่วยาวผัดพริกเผา (Tua Yao Pad Prik Pow) : Vegetables is one area where Asian cooking excels. I can’t think of a single Western vegetable dish as interesting and tasty as this one dish. It uses “long beans” – ถั่วยาว (tua yao) – which are somewhat similar to green beans but thinner around – they can be dark green, light green or purple in color. Although they are cooked with garlic (of course), fish sauce and  Thai basil (ใบโหระพา – bai horapa), the defining taste of this dish comes from roasted chili paste – น้ำพริกเผา (nam prik pao). This paste is one of the most commonly used seafood-based pastes in Thai cooking; the roasted flavors give a fragrant backdrop to a paste that is hot and shrimpy as well as sweet and tangy. This is a flavorful, delicious vegetable dish. (Read Kasma’s information on Roasted Chilli Paste – (Nam Prik Pao).)

Sticky Rice & Mango

Sticky Rice and Mango

Sticky Rice and Mango – ข้าวเหนียวมะม่วง (Kao Niao Mamuang):  This is perhaps the best known Thai dessert outside of Thailand, though in Thailand it is more of a snack (a kanom – ขนม) that would be eaten by itself at any time of the day. White sticky rice is given a sweet coconut sauce and then served with mangoes. In Thailand, it is also served with durian, in season. (See Michael’s blog on Thong Lo Mangos (and Sticky Rice).)

Kasma’s recipe for this delicious dish can be found here: Coconut-Flavored Sticky Rice with Mangoes (ข้าวเหนียวมะม่วง – Kao Niow Mamuang).

Black Sticky Rice Pudding

Black Sticky Rice Pudding

Black Sweet Rice Pudding – ข้าวเหนียวดำ (Kao Niow Dahm): Another sweet sticky rice dessert, topped with toasted coconut and sesame seeds. Some students like this even better than the White Sticky Rice and Mangos. The black sticky rice is a whole grain with a nutty flavor. See Kasma’s recipe Black Sticky Rice Pudding (ข้าวเหนียวดำ Kao Niow Dahm).


Slideshow – Garlic Peppered Shrimp
Click on “Play” below to begin a slideshow.

Clicking on a slide will take you to the next image.

Frying Shrimp
Kasma Cooks
Removing Shrimp
Fried Shrimp
Garlic Peppered Shrimp

Deep-frying shrimp for Garlic Peppered Shrimp

Kasma fries shrimp for Garlic Peppered Shrimp

Removing the deep-fried shrimp onto a drainer

Crispy-fried shrimp, removed from the wok

The finished dish: Garlic-Peppered Shrimp - กุ้งกระเทียมพริกไทย (Goong Kratiem Prik Thai)

Frying Shrimp thumbnail
Kasma Cooks thumbnail
Removing Shrimp thumbnail
Fried Shrimp thumbnail
Garlic Peppered Shrimp thumbnail

Written by Michael Babcock, September 2012

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