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Melt Me Chocolate, Revisited

Michael Babcock, Friday, March 15th, 2013

Melt Me Chocolate in Bangkok makes some of my favorite chocolate anywhere. Although I don’t really associate Thailand with chocolate, I do always manage to find my way to Melt Me at least a couple times when I’m in Thailand to get the two items there that I enjoy the most.

Chocolate Squares

Hokkaido Dark Chocolate

Melt Me says that their chocolate is “Hokkaido Chocolate.” I’ve been unable to track down anything specific about such chocolate but a Japanese friend tells me that Hokkaido is known for its rich butter, milk and cream, so you would expect Hokkaido Chocolate to be rich and creamy. Melt Me chocolate is.

(Click images to see larger version.)

Perhaps my favorite item there is the “Hokkaido Dark.” It’s made with 70% chocolate. As I said in a previous blog: “The dark chocolate is rich, creamy and bittersweet, almost like a truffle in its consistency; it does, literally, melt in your mouth. It’s a luxurious confection: rich and tasty.” These are very rich; usually one is enough to satisfy me. Which is good! They cost 270 baht for a box of 15 – currently about $9.00 U.S., so about 60 cents each. You can also get 30 for 480 baht (about 53 cents, each).

Chocolate Treat

Chocolate Covered Macadamia Nuts

They also make a Hokkaido Dark 80% (300 baht for 15). I have tried them and, although, they’re quite good, they are (of course) a bit less sweet and they also seemed a bit less creamy to me than the standard Hokkaido Dark. I prefer the Hokkaido dark.

We also love the the Chocolate Covered Macadamia Nuts; they’re crispy and delicious. We suspect they’ve been roasted crisp and possibly coated with a praline before they are covered over with the bittersweet chocolate. Macadamia nuts are very rich to begin with and with the chocolate these are very rich indeed: a few nuts usually suffice to satisfy. They are not inexpensive: 350 baht (about $12.00 U.S., at this time) for a not so large box. Thankfully, just a couple tastes are enough to satisfy. Like the Hokkaido Dark they are rich enough that I can’t eat that much at one time.

I previously blogged on Melt Me in a March 2011 blog, Great Chocolate; in Thailand! which highlighted the Melt Me Chocolate outlet at Paradise Park Mall. Unfortunately, this outlet is now closed down, so we have had to find other ways to get our Melt Me fix.

Melt Me Sign

Melt Me at Arena 10

Melt Me Counter

Counter at the Melt Me at Arena 10

We now go the main outlet at Arena 10 on Thong Lor (Sukhumvit 55) Soi 10. The picture above left shows the store from the outside; to the right is the main counter inside. The staff is very friendly there. See below for directions.

Sitting Area

Sitting Area at Melt Me Arena 10

The Arena 10 store is set up as a pleasant place to come to eat desserts. To the left is the sitting area, a pleasant place to be while you’re eating your treats. In addition to our favorite items, they have baked desserts (we’ve tried the chocolate cake and Kasma tried the cheese cake one time) and they also sell fresh brewed coffee. It would be a great place to come after a meal to sit and enjoy dessert and coffee. They also sell a number of truffles; these are on our list to try at some point. If I recall correctly, they are open until midnight most days and until 2 or 3:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. (I’d phone, first, if going late.)

Gelato

Gelato at Melt Me Chocolates

We also get the gelato here. It’s very rich and flavorful. My favorites are the dark chocolate, the hazlenut and the passion fruit sorbet. I also like the green tea gelato: it’s stronger in flavor than many green tea ice creams. Two different flavors in a cup cost 99 baht – over $3.00 U.S. at today’s prices; that’s not a much less than I pay at many places in the U.S.: by Thai standards, it’s a bit pricey. As an occasional treat, though, it’s well worth it to me.

This year we were at the upscale mall Central World to eat at a restaurant there and were pleased to discover a Melt Me outlet (directions below). It was a perfect place to get some gelato after our lunch.

There are a total of 8 Melt Me out branches at this time. I don’t know if all of them serve gelato.

How To Get There

Arena 10

Here’s the full address for the Arena 10 Melt Me:

Arena 10 Thong Lor 10,
225/11 Soi Thong Lor 10 (also given as 225/1 Soi 5, Sukhumvit 63 (Ekamai))z
Sukhumvit Rd., Khlong Tan Nuea,
Wattana, Bangkok 10110
Tel: 090-1975-600

Note. Thong Lor, also spelled Thong Lo, Thonglor or Thonglo (but really pronounced “tawng law”) is the name for Sukhumvit Soi 55. Thong Lo Soi 10 is also Ekamai (Suhkumvit Soi 63) Soi 5. (It’s complicated.)

External Sign

Sign outside Arena 10

Sign Detail

The Melt Me Sign

One option is to take a taxi. You can also take the Skytrain (BTS) to the “Thong Lo” station. From there it’s probably a 20 minute walk; it’s often very hot in Bangkok, though, so you could catch a taxi from there or a motorcycle taxi.

Here’s a Map to Melt Me, Thonglor

Central World

Second Melt Me

Melt Me at Central World

Here’s the address for the Central World Melt Me
Central World 7th Floor, Supermarket Entrance
999/9 Rama 1 Rd.
Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330
Tel: 090-1975-601

Here’s a Map to Central World

The easiest way is to take the BTS (skytrain) to the Chit Lom station; there’s a covered walkway to Central World.


External Links (open in new windows):

Written by Michael Babcock, March 2013

Don’t Miss Naem Sour Sausage When Visiting Northern Thailand

Kasma Loha-unchit, Friday, March 1st, 2013

Naem (or nem), also known as jin som in the northern Thai dialect (jin = meat, som = sour) is a common way of preserving pork meat in several Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. In Thailand, it is mainly done in the northern and northeastern parts of the country – the land-locked regions where a lot of pigs are raised and pork features prominently in the local cuisines.

Wrapped Naem

Naem wrapped in banana leaves

(Click images to see larger version.)

In the days before refrigeration, when a pig was slaughtered, there was usually too much meat to cook and eat up fresh in dishes like laab, soups, curries and stir-fries. The remaining meat would be chopped up and preserved with salt. Pork skin, also often too much to eat up by cooking fresh, was added to improve texture.

Now as then, cooked sticky rice or plain steamed rice is used to make the meat develop a sour flavor. Garlic and Thai chillies are added to further improve flavor. In the olden days, pork fat was in the mixture as well, but in more modern times, naem is made mostly of lean pork meat, which gives a better color to the soured meat.

Naem Maw 1

Naem maw (made in a large pot)

The sour flavor imparted to the meat from fermenting rice is distinctive and unique and is unlike the sour from citrus, vinegar, tamarind, or any other tart fruits. It is simply delicious and quite addicting for those of us who like foods with sour flavors.

Originally, the meat was cured by placing the mixture in a pot or a large bowl and covered to make it airtight, thus giving the name naem maw (maw = pot). Market vendors still sell naem in this form – that is, it’s sold bulk in a large bowl, the vendor cutting and scooping up the amount customers want and wrapping it in pieces of banana leaf, secured with a bamboo pick. In city markets nowadays, this form of naem is usually already pre-cut into uniform chunks and wrapped in plastic with a label slapped on.

Naem Maw 2

More naem maw

Naem Maw 3

Naem maw on top of naem taeng

Naem Taeng 2

Banana-leaf wrapped naem taeng

Later, naem began to be made in short, cylindrical bundles tightly wrapped in several layers of banana leaf and tied tightly with bamboo strings. Nowadays they are mostly made in long, sausage-like logs tightly wrapped and sealed in heavy-duty plastic wrap. Both these forms of naem are called naem taeng (taeng = cylinder). Naem is also tightly wrapped in small pyramidal shapes tied with bamboo strings. Often the leaf-wrapped packages are hung in a cool place (in the tropical room temperature) out of direct sun exposure and allowed to cure until the sour flavor develops. The banana leaf helps moderate the temperature of the meat so that the internal temperature does not get too warm. These days, these banana leaf-wrapped packages are often wrapped again in plastic wrap to keep the banana leaf from drying out.

Naem Taeng 1

Naem taeng (cylinder naem)

In modern times, plastic wrap has become prevalently used in wrapping naem, because it is easy to use and makes it possible for buyers to see the color of the meat. In the tropics where room temperature is fairly warm, it usually takes only 2 to 3 days for the sour flavor to develop, but in temperate climate kitchens such as in the Bay Area, it takes about a week. When juice or moistness can be seen through the plastic wrapping, the naem is usually ready. With the banana leaf-wrapped packages, buyers look for leaf wrappings that are not too freshly green, but not too dried out either.

2 Naem Taeng

Traditional & modern naem taeng

Naem Taeng Unwrapped

Naem Taeng Unwrapped

Grilled Naem Sausages

Grilled naem sausages

Sticky rice was originally used as the souring agent, but later the preference turned to regular cooked rice because it keeps the meat sour for longer after the sour flavor has developed and gives the meat a better pink color. Sticky rice, on the other hand, develops the sour flavor more quickly, but also loses the sour flavor faster, giving the meat a shorter window of opportunity for consumption at its optimal sourness.

Food Platter

Food platter, naem on the left

One reason why many northern Thais still prefer to have some of their naem wrapped in banana leaf is that it can be cooked by roasting in the ashes of their charcoal brazier, burning the outer layers of leaf to give the meat a smoky flavor. Often, naem is eaten raw and the small pyramidal leaf-wrapped packets are pretty and easy to serve individual people in a meal. Raw naem, appearing as those translucent, pinkish slices of meat, is a common part of the northern hors d’oeuvre platter, accompanying slices of spicy sai oa northern sausage, baloney-like moo yaw, crispy fried pork belly with skin (kaep moo), an assortment of steamed or boiled vegetables, and the favorite spicy green chilli dip called nam prik nuum.

Naem Ready To Eat

Naem, ready to eat

Raw naem is frequently made into hot-and-sour yum salads with shallots, pickled garlic, Thai chillies, aromatic herbs and fried nuts, but if you are squeamish about eating raw, cured meat, cook the naem by roasting in banana leaves or by lightly steaming or baking before slicing to make the salad. But if you wish to enjoy the delicate texture of raw meat like Southeast Asians do in a safe manner, you may wish to freeze the sausage for about two weeks to kill off any parasites before consuming.

Naem With Garlic

Sliced Naem with Pickled Garlic and Chillies

Naem Fried Rice

Naem Fried Rice

Other common ways naem is eaten in northern Thailand are: stir-fried with pickled garlic/leeks and chillies; scrambled with eggs and onions; incorporated into fried rice; deep-fried by itself in slices or round balls and eaten with fried peanuts, diced ginger and chillies; added to curries, spicy soups or stir-fries with mucilaginous vegetables like pak bpang (zan choi in Chinese or the “slippery vegetable”) or okra to reduce the mucilaginous property; sliced and tossed with crisp-fried rice, slivered cooked pork skin, fried dried Thai chillies, slivered ginger, fried peanuts and other ingredients to make a crisped rice and sour sausage salad – a delicious street and market food that has now become popular in many restaurants that serve regional cuisines in Bangkok and other major cities throughout the country.


Some More Thai Dishes with Naem Sour Sausage

Fried Naem Maw

Fried Naem Maw

Crispy Fried Naem

Crispy Fried Naem Sour Sausage Balls

The picture to the above left shows naem maw cut into cubes, dipped in egg and deep-fried (naem tawd) at Kaeng Ron Ban Suan in Chiang Mai. On the right is deep-fried, crispy naem sour sausage balls in a crispy taro basket in a Chiang Mai restaurant.

Soup With Naem

Soup with naem

Stir-fried Naem

Naem Stir-fried with Egg and Spinach

To the above left is a soup made with the flowers of pak bpang (zan choi in Chinese) and naem to reduce the mucilaginous property of the vegetable at Come Dara restaurant in Chiang Mai. To the right is naem stir-fried with egg and spinach at Keuy Chiang Mai restaurant.

Naem Salad

Crispy Rice and Naem Sour Sausage Salad

Naem Salad 2

Crispy Rice and Naem Sour Sausage Salad

To the above left is Crispy Rice and Naem Sour Sausage Salad (Naem Kluk Kao Tawd) at Ton Kreuang in Bangkok. To the right is Crispy Rice and Naem Sour Sausage Salad (Yum Naem Kao Tawd) at the Isan restaurant of Vientiane Kitchen in Bangkok.


Naem Slideshow From Kasma’s Classes

Click on “Play” below to begin a slideshow.

Clicking on a slide will take you to the next image.

Rolling Naem
Prepped Naem
Assembling Naem Salad
Naem Salad 3
Fried Naem
Stir-fried Naem
Stir-fried Naem 2

Rolling the naem sausages into a tight cylinder in Kasma's class

The soured naem sausages sliced and ready for cooking in a weeklong intensive class

Assembling the Crispy Rice and Naem Sour Sausage Salad in a weeklong intensive class

Crispy Rice and Sour Sausage Salad made by students in Kasma's Advanced B weeklong intensive class

Fried Naem Slices on Crispy Taro Baskets, in Kasma's Advanced D weeklong intensive class - students made the naem and fermented it for 5 days

Naem Sour Sausage (made by students) Stir-fried with Pickled Leeks and Thai Chillies in Kasma's Advanced D weeklong intensive

Naem Sour Sausage (made by students) Stir-fried with Bitter Melon, Eggs and Thai Chillies in Kasma's Advanced D weeklong intensive

Rolling Naem thumbnail
Prepped Naem thumbnail
Assembling Naem Salad thumbnail
Naem Salad 3 thumbnail
Fried Naem thumbnail
Stir-fried Naem thumbnail
Stir-fried Naem 2 thumbnail

Written by Kasma Loha-unchit, March 2013